IN MEMORY OF: THE MOST HONORABLE MALCOLM X, AL HAJJ MALIK AL SHABAZZ

Malcolm Lecturn

We all have dreams and aspirations to reach up for the stars. But under the stars and your dreams there are gun towers. Those gun towers cast long dark shadows on the yard to block the light of the stars from your view. They are instruments of repression which imprison you. They always have you in the cross hairs of their scope.

The towers rise high above the yard and from every corner of them extend  dark rifle muzzles  from shaded rooms behind which are nameless faceless shooters ready to take aim at any one who would have the courage to ascend the wall to take their freedom.  So we see the Michael Browns, the Eric Garners, and thousands of others like them taken down.

Sporadically, we all walk our yard and when we do we step into and out of lines of fire as do miniature figurines in a shooting gallery. 

It is a mind boggling experience to watch the endless procession of hapless men and women. We are that procession of people who continue generation after generation spewing forth from all the four horizons of the world to converge on a yard wherein we like peas in a pod live out our lives indistinguishable one from the other.

But there are deeper connections between us. We see and feel those connections every day. We are on some kind of conveyor belt a kind of assembly line.

It rolls us along a feedback loop between the prisons and our neighborhoods. It sweeps whole families away.  We are related to each other by blood and even if we are not then we are interconnected by a common subconscious mind which binds us to a network of fractured images. Such are the kinds of images which continually distort our perception of reality as would happen to one in a carnival’s house of mirrors. We see our reflections.

Faces are young and old. They play the same old roles consigned to them over and over again generation after generation. Typecast our energy is not our own it is continually sapped from us as oil is pumped from deep beneath the earth.

We are the lumpenproliteriate. The prison yard is our estate. But the illusion is such that we are not aware that the estate which we have inherited is bankrupt. We like Malcolm X have come to know that our estate is one wherein we should expect poverty. And what of the experience of our dear brother Malcolm X?

Did Malcolm X know that he was a figurine? A whatnot, a caricature of a man?  Was he such a thing having no power of self-animation? Was he a thing to be forever moved by inimical forces? The forces which giveth and taketh away?

The young Malcolm lost his civil rights and even more importantly he lost the power of his soul. Those two are the elements which great philosophers celebrate as the context of all relations between government and its citizens.

It as a way of life based upon a simple proposition. Government cannot be the context of human relations between it and the citizens who created it. Citizens don’t live in government because government is an idea in the mind of its citizens. Government, therefore, is a momentary choice citizens make about what government should be as citizens live their lives free, outside of government.

How does it happen that Malcolm X walked the yard in the line of fire? By what rule of logic does such an inversion from citizen over government to government over citizen take place? And can it be reversed?

Malcolm X must have pondered that his situation was a contradiction of all that we say is a man and woman’s inherent right. That incarcerated he could not by his free will even expand his lungs to take in fresh air.

How repressed he must have felt in that  situation.  His dawning dreams forced down to the ground and mixed with his base impulses must have caused extreme confusion in his mind.

That kind of confusion can only occur in one’s mind when the concept of freedom is turned inside out by the voice and actions of one’s fears. Such is a life lived out of misdirected attachments to what one falsely concludes are worthy objects of attraction. But if one wants to change, then a decision to change one’s life is a crisis. For an effort by anyone to replace unworthy objects of attraction is full of danger.

To self-motivate is to rise above the gun towers by spiritual force alone. It means not to fear ideas. It means not to fear the capacity to dream. It means to risk death by his choice to be free. 

It is a risk that all courageous men and women have taken throughout history and it is the greatest risk that courageous men and women take to be free today. 

Malcolm X knew that to become free he must fight. He learned that the fight would be spiritual in nature. He knew he had to fight so that he could claim and exercise his inherent natural rights against all oppressive forces.  He knew that it would take not one, two, or even 10 rounds to fight, but that it would take a life time of struggle day in and day out.

 His decision must have made him intuit that any stall or step backward in his struggle would have put him in the line of fire and trigger a shot from the gun tower. But more importantly, his fight could not be a response to fear nor could it be a fight solely in response to the power of the shooter.

Rather, Malcolm X understood his fight had to emanate from a completely transformed subconscious mind in conjunction with a clear consciousness of freedom and the price which he had chosen to pay so that he could have it. 

You are on the yard, too and you are in for the fight of your life, too.  So, prisoner, have courage and fight. 

 Malcolm X Statue2

 

 

WHAT IS BLACK HISTORY?, by Dr. Steven Nur Ahmed

Malcolm X Statue2

It is Black History month and last night I attended a speech given by Julian Bond at a local community college. Julian Bond was a student of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1960. The event was held in a large auditorium. As I scanned the crowd which nearly filled the facility I observed that 75% or more of the people present were white.

The presence of white people is not bad in and of itself. But the master of ceremony was a white judge; the technicians were white men; the highest honor of the night was awarded to a white woman and presented by another white woman; the vice president of the college who was a black woman was merely introduced and then quickly ushered off stage; the questions from the audience were literally censored by a white man.

And to make matters worse the roles assigned to black people were stereotypical. The ushers were black; the dancer was black; and the singers were black. There was one young African American male who did a recitation of Dr. Martin Luther King’s ‘Letter from a Birmingham Jail’.  So after all was said and done it was the same old message, white people are in control of black people’s identity. One of the important goals of white supremacy is to control their victim’s identity.

White people were in total control of that black history event. Despite the fact the Julian Bond’s speech was sugar coated, from the top to the bottom one thing was clear. White people were in control.

White people are in total control of Black History Month throughout the United States. Insofar as they are successful at controlling such events white people are controlling and limiting the opportunity for black people to exercise their right to free speech in public forums.

My observation compelled me to ask myself some important questions. So as I sat there and listened to Julian Bond speak I did a reality check on our people, African Americans.

What is ‘Black History?’ Is it the recorded experiences of black people in the Americas by black people? Or is ‘Black History’ just another chapter among hundreds of chapters recorded by White people about all Black people worldwide?

If we peel back the layers of black experience in the United States dating from 2015 back to 1619 we get to the very core of what forces have made black people and thus our history. We find exactly what drives black people in the ‘here and nowness’ of their unique collective and individual experiences. We will find the cultural core values.

The earth has an iron core which rotates and generates the magnetic power which makes life possible on earth. Analogously, the core of black people’s unique collective and individual experiences of ‘here and nowness’ is fertility in relation to economy. If you control your fertility and have an economy you have a chance to live free.

Fertility and economy is what made life possible for black people in the United States.  Giving birth to babies is what qualifies any population as ‘fit’. The more babies, the more fit. The fewer babies the less fit. This is so because life in and of itself is a delicate biological balance between survival and crisis or extinction.

Conception and birth always keep life and thus black people one step ahead of extinction. But birth is inseparably intertwined with economy. And economy is necessary for one fundamental reason. Babies must be fed.

To feed babies, resources must be accessed. For the sake of the babies, resources must be accessed either in cooperation with others or in accommodation to others; either in conflict with others or in competition against others. Whoever those others may be.

The values of food, clothing, shelter, and means of trade like money must be sought out and obtained. Just as a hunter will pursue and capture game, the sole focus of a culture is to swarm the landscape for what it needs to survive.

Resources must be apportioned and distributed to babies who in turn must gradually learn the skills necessary to continue to generate offspring and acquire the necessities of life. All of that is what people do at the level where life is bump and grind. 

When or if black people lose their fertility and fail to learn cutting edge economic skills there will follow a gradual cessation of their unique collective and individual experiences of ‘here and nowness’. Eventually, they will fail to generate a living culture which can blossom into what we call black history. Thus at every moment we are at the fork in the road.

Black history can be either tragic or it can be what gives rise to waves of ecstatic inspiration reaching over countless generations. The choice “to be or not to be” cannot be avoided.

Most black people worldwide do not celebrate ‘Black History’ month nor even entertain the idea of ‘Black History’. In Africa, India, South America, the Caribbean Islands, Australia, and the south Pacific Islands, black people do not celebrate Black History and they probably don’t define themselves as ‘Black People’. They don’t celebrate because they have their own cultures, histories, religions, and mythologies with which they identify. What that means is that black people in the United States are irreparably cut off from all other black people in the world.

I do not mean that we should not travel to learn the many cultures past and present in which other black people live or have lived;  but rather what I do mean is that we shall never be capable of networking subconsciously with black people in other cultures throughout the world because they and we see the world through different lenses crafted by different cultural experiences over vast stretches of time. 

So we, here and now, in the United States are cut off forever. We have become cultural freaks among the societies of the world because we have assimilated more of the formless popular American culture than any other subculture in history. For example, from day to day or month to month, it is no telling what values we will be doing.  There is no telling what food we shall eat; no telling what clothing we shall choose to wear or whether we shall wear clothing at all, and where and in what we shall live or whether we shall be homeless and living on the streets.

Ultimately, there is a universal rule which applies to us as it does to all people. We shall either be self-sufficient or we shall be a population of beggars always needing to be habilitated or rehabilitated to the latest mode of what others define for us as right or moral. All of that leads to another fact.

We, black people, are as culturally unstable as American popular culture is unstable and for that reason we are culturally unpredictable; we are like an ever spinning roulette wheel turned by the hands of others.

Those two facts mean that we can predict with a high degree of certainty that we, black people, in the United States shall not achieve the degree of ethnic unity which will make for a higher collective fertility rate and for higher collective economic self-sufficiency. Parallel to that we can predict that non-black people will be in control of Black History and that in the long run we may in fact wind up being only: ‘Black History’.

http://www.spreaker.com/user/themalcolmxsociety/dr-king-and-malcolm-x-on-common-ground